Request Request an Appointment Forms Complete Our Forms Find Us Like Us on Facebook Reviews Leave a Google Review RateABiz Rate-A-Biz Reviews Call Map
900 Ranch Rd 620 S Suite C200, Austin, TX 78734
Now Open, Important Safety Notice

How Does Juice Affect Kids’ Teeth?

October 28, 2020

Filed under: Uncategorized — lakewaydentist @ 11:12 pm

Child drinking juiceYou may think that juice is good for you. After all, it’s made from fruit. However, this isn’t necessarily true when it comes to your child’s smile. What you thought was a nutritious beverage can actually sometimes be full of sugar and just as bad for teeth as soda. As amazing as it might taste, it probably isn’t the best option for your child to sip on throughout the day. Continue reading to learn more from your family dentist in Lakeway about the way juice affects your child’s teeth.

What Is in Fruit Juice?

When you purchase juice at the store, you should be aware that not all of them are 100% juice. Fruit blends tend to only contain a small amount of different fruit juices and have lots of added sugars. Juice cocktails often contain additional sugar, water, and only a small amount of juice. When you find beverages like fruit punch, they contain little nutritional value at all.

If you’re picking out 100% juice, you should know that they aren’t necessarily healthy either. Apple, grape, and cranberry juice have just as much sugar in them as soda does. That’s why it isn’t recommended that kids have any more than 4-6 ounces of fruit juice each day.

How Does Juice Harm Children’s Teeth?

When young kids come to their children’s dentist in Lakeway needing to have cavities filled, fruit juice and other sugary beverages are usually the cause. This is because the sugar in the juice fuels bacteria in the mouth, creating harmful acid. This acid then slowly eats away at the protective layer of the teeth, causing cavities over time. If your child is drinking it out of a sippy cup, this can be even worse. This is become they are designed to release liquid slowly, allowing it to pool up in the mouth and fuel bacteria for even longer.

What Should My Child Drink Instead?

Better options for your child’s teeth are whole milk, sparkling water, and fluoridated tap water. Juice on occasion is okay, but sugary beverages should be cut out as much as possible. When choosing juice products, make sure they are 100% juice with no added sugar. Tomato, vegetable, grape, berry, and orange juices are more rich in vitamins. Ensure that they are drinking no more than 4 to 6 ounces each day. Another smart step you could take is diluting it with water.

Juice tastes delicious to younger children, but it isn’t good for their teeth. By being aware and making smart choices about the quantity and quality of the juice that your kids are drinking, they can continue on a path towards healthy, happy smiles.

About the Author

Dr. Winston Eaddy is a well experienced family dentist who has been practicing for over four decades. He earned his dental degree from the College of Dental Medicine, Medical University of S.C. before receiving his specialty degree in Periodontics. Dr. Eaddy holds memberships for numerous professional organizations including the American Dental Association and the Texas Dental Association. For more information on keeping your child’s smile healthy or to schedule an appointment, visit his website or call (512) 263-4252.

No Comments

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.